Top Shot Sportfishing Charters

Fort Lauderdale fishing report for Top Shot Sportfishing Charters and the “Happy Day Today” a 52′ Hatteras sportfish. The Easterly wind was blowing last week combined with a light north current the conditions lined up for some great fishing action. We had a well-rounded fishing strategy by first starting with catching live bait at the sea bouy, then trolling the reef for King Mackerel and Tuna, then running offshore the Fort Lauderdale beaches for Mahi Mahi.

Targeting King Mackerel in 100 feet of water near the reef is a common and effective approach, as these fish often inhabit areas with structures and drop-offs while fishing in Fort Lauderdale. Using deep planner lines is a smart move for targeting King Mackerel, as they are known to swim at various depths. The live bait caught at the sea buoy likely attracted the attention of the King Mackerel, which are predatory fish and often feed on smaller fish. In addition to King Mackerel we are also catching Black Fin Tuna, Wahoo and Sailfish. Black Fin Tuna are known for their speed and agility, often putting up a strong fight when hooked. They are highly prized for their delicious flesh, making them a favorite among anglers. Wahoo, with their sharp teeth and powerful runs, are notorious for being a challenging catch. They are known for their speed and the adrenaline-pumping action they provide during the fight. Sailfish are prized for their acrobatic displays and are considered one of the most thrilling game fish. If you encountered Sailfish while trolling, that’s an exciting bonus to an already diverse catch. Fishing near the reef also offers the opportunity to catch a variety of other species.

         

Next we ran a few miles offshore Fort Lauderdale and fishing for Mahi Mahi. Once we found the pretty blue water there was scattered sea weed, floating debris and birds working the area. Trolling along the edge of color changes, especially where there’s bait fish and floating debris, is a common and effective technique for catching Mahi Mahi (also known as dolphin or dorado). The blue and green edge indicates a change in water temperature, and Mahi Mahi are known to gather around such areas in search of prey.

         

Finding floating debris, such as sargassum weed or other debris, is a good sign as it often attracts small fish and other marine life, which in turn attracts larger predators like Mahi Mahi. These colorful fish are known for their acrobatic displays when hooked, making them a popular and thrilling catch for anglers.

Fishing with four surface lines, a bridge teaser, and a deep planner line is a comprehensive approach that covers different depths in the water column, increasing your chances of attracting and hooking Mahi Mahi.

We encountered Mahi Mahi every quarter mile or so while charter fishing in Fort Lauderdale and there was a good concentration of these fish. Mahi Mahi are known for their schooling behavior, and finding one group often means there are more nearby. We hooked and caught the Mahi with each new piece of floating debris or just the lucky “out of the blue” strikes.

         

It’s not uncommon for Mahi Mahi to display acrobatic jumps and attempts to shake off the line during the fight, so losing a few is a common part of the experience. We were able to capitalize on most of the fish hooked, resulting in a successful day on the water.

If your looking to target Black Fin Tuna, Wahoo, Sailfish or Mahi Mahi. Contact Capt. Dave Zsak with Top Shot Sportfishing Charters and the fishing charter boat “Happy Day Today” located in Fort Lauderdale.